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This page is part of an archive of historical details from existing or defunct brass band websites. This is being maintained to provide a record of this information in the event of a band folding, its website disappearing or other loss of the historical record. Where possible, and appropriate, the information cached will be updated from time to time - and any corrections or updates are welcome.



Clifton and Lightcliffe Band

It is said that The Clifton and Lightcliffe Band was founded in 1838 at Clifton, a small village on the outskirts of Brighouse - in the early nineteenth century most inhabitants of the village were employed in either agriculture or coal mining. With industrial progress and so many people needed to work in the mills, factories and the mines, working conditions were becoming a serious issue and the reason for unrest amongst some of the workers.

Just how the then Clifton Prize Band actually began still remains a mystery to this day but records do exist showing it was active locally during the 1860's with the band rehearsing in a number of locations within the village - the use of licensed premises were put to regular use. Like many other bands it has had what can be called its fair share of ups and downs and like many other bands the downs have tended to have outshone the ups in recent years.

Although it went through a purple patch before the first world war with two prizes at the Crystal Palace. From those few years of success it went through further problems until in September 1932 when Mr Newton Brooke, a prominent Lightcliffe business man offered to step in and save the day. However, one of his conditions to his family becoming involved was that the band had to change its name to include Lightcliffe in its title hence it was renamed The Clifton and Lightcliffe Band, and moved to its present headquarters at Bailiff Bridge.

Over its long history it can say with pride that a number of its members have made the grade and gone on to a number of top flight bands.

Since the end of the second world war the Clifton and Lightcliffe Band has had few but, still memorable trips to the National Finals, one of the last being in 1983. Two or three years ago the band reached the edge of the abyss once again but following a make or break meeting the remaining members and one or two players from the past and a number of its junior band members rallied together and now it feels that once again it has turned the tide.